Whole Grains For Your Heart

2017/11/15 Posted by

Whole grains are important for good health. So what is in a grain and why are they important? This article will give you a brief overview of a whole grain, and why they’re better for you than their refined versions. A grain is the seed of a plant and a whole grain contains parts known as the endosperm, the bran, and the germ. Heart Diseases are increasing substantially at a much higher rate globally as compared to other diseases due to changing lifestyle and living conditions apart from common risk factors like age and family history. Youngsters and Middle-aged adults are found to be more prone to heart diseases due to their unhealthy food habits and working lifestyle as compared to old adults. Foods that contain  whole grains, on the other hand, provide a number of nutritional benefits. According to the American Cancer Society, they may reduce risk of developing cancers of the colon, stomach and endometrium, as well as reducing risk of heart disease They also have a positive effect on carbohydrate metabolism and control of blood sugar, which may decrease risk of developing adult-onset (Type II) diabetes. Refined grains (like white flours and white rice) present poor nutrition, leaving the body still hungry for good nutrition. Although, some of the “vitamins” and “minerals” are added back in after the milling process, nothing artificial can regain what was once there naturally.

Refined grains are absorbed too quickly into the blood stream causing upsets in blood sugar levels which exhausts the pancreas and/or the adrenal glands. Also, since the bran is discarded during the refining process there is no longer much fiber in the grain either. Our body needs fiber in order to help clean out our intestines, so when refined grains are eaten they act more like glue to your intestines which can cause multiple health problems. The composition of whole grains as defined by US FDA is “consisting of the intact, ground, cracked, or flaked fruit of the grains whose principal components, the starchy endosperm, germ, and bran, are present in the same relative proportions as they exist in the intact grain. In addition to lowering your risk of developing cancer and heart disease, minimally processed grains are a low-fat source of complex carbohydrates, which fuels your body, and they contain substantial amounts of fiber, which is important for gastrointestinal health. And fiber not only helps keep your digestive system in top condition, it also helps you feel full on fewer calories. In fact, a USDA study found that people who consumed 18 to 36 grams of fiber a day absorbed 130 fewer daily calories. The choice seems obvious to me. Whole grains have many health benefits while refined grains do not. One is helpful to your body, while the other is detrimental to it. The bottom line is we all should be eating more whole grains to live longer healthier lives.

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