The Health Benefits of Whole Grain Brown Rice

2017/05/14 Posted by

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stipulates that any food labeled “whole grain” must contain 51 percent or more whole-grain ingredients (by weight). This is a reference to the entire edible part of a grain, including the germ, which is actually the sprout of a new plant; the endosperm, where the grain stores its energy; and the bran, the grain’s high-in-nutrients outer layer. But refined or processed grain products — such as bleached flour and white bread — have the bran and germ portion of the grain removed during milling. This process makes grain lower in fiber and removes about 80 percent of the nutrients. What’s in a color? How does being white or brown makes rice with difference in properties? But the difference between brown rice and white rice is not just color. Brown rice has only the outermost layer, the hull, removed. This way the nutritional value of the rice is not compromised. When brown rice is further milled to remove the bran and most of the germ layer, the result is whiter rice, which has lost many more nutrients. But the white rice we see is further polished. A layer filled with health-supportive, essential fats is removed to make white rice. The resulting white rice is simply a refined starch that is devoid of its basic nutrients.  The health benefits of brown rice are immeasurable. Brown rice is a whole grain meaning it contains a large amount of fiber. This is due to the fact that the whole grain contains all three components: bran, germ, and endosperm. Conversely, when grain is processed, all that is left is the endosperm. Why is this significant? When the endosperm is left intact, it generates all of the proteins; the bran contains approximately 80% of the minerals; and the germ contains vitamin E, minerals, senior life insurance unsaturated fats, antioxidants, and phytochemicals which are chemicals found in fruits, vegetables, beans, and other types of plant food. In addition, it has been ascertained that the antioxidant levels in whole grains are higher than in white rice, for example, and serve to prevent against the onset of cell damage. Vitamin E is also an antioxidant. Breads and breakfast cereals (like oatmeal, bran flakes and shredded wheat) provide most of the whole grains in the typical American diet. But don’t forget the others: Barley or quinoa (a tiny, bead-shaped grain that takes half the cooking time of rice) is great in soups, and bulgur (wheat kernels) is delicious in salads. Try whole-wheat pasta, or side dishes like brown rice or corn. You even can get whole grains in snacks, such as whole-wheat crackers or air-popped popcorn. The fibers present in brown rice, increase bowl movement, thus helping in reducing constipation. Brown rice is a good source of manganese, selenium and magnesium. Manganese helps in energy production and antioxidant protection. It is also involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, which are important for a healthy nervous system, and in the production of cholesterol, which is used by the body to produce sex hormones. It provides protection against damage from the free radicals produced during energy production. The oil in whole brown rice minimizes cholesterol. So you have yet another reason to start eating brown rice. In addition to this, brown rice is also rich in B vitamins. Especially women after menopause should include brown rice in their diet. Those with high cholesterol, high blood pressure or other signs of cardiovascular disease benefit a lot from 4-5 servings of brown rice.  Most products you find in your supermarket are increasing their fiber content utilizing whole grains which not only lower cholesterol, but contain less sugar as well. Most diets today consist of low fat, high fiber diets. A high fiber diet would primarily consist of whole grains such as brown rice. Consuming brown rice health insurance online three times a day will alleviate the hunger and leave you fully sated thus avoiding sweets and other foods which add to weight gain.

 


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